Video 6 Apr

Love these salted black licorice balls! Like the coins just posted, I got them at Chocolate by Mueller at the Reading Terminal Market near Philadelphia City Hall. They’re wonderful! As you can see, they’re about grape sized and while hard black on the outside, they’re lighter-colored and chewy on the inside. They remind me of malted milk balls. 

Photo 6 Apr Picked these up at a candy shop at the amazing Reading Terminal Market in Philadelphia. Not sure of their origin, though I would guess Dutch or German. They’re mildly salty licorice coins of different denominations, though all are of the same size.

Picked these up at a candy shop at the amazing Reading Terminal Market in Philadelphia. Not sure of their origin, though I would guess Dutch or German. They’re mildly salty licorice coins of different denominations, though all are of the same size.

Video 26 Mar 1 note

Today I cracked open a box of Saila “Extra Forte” pure licorice for the first time. This was a gift from my best friend, who picked them up at a bar in Naples. Saila produces a wide variety of flavors, with mints and mint-licorice being I’m guessing the most popular, but this is the pure. As the packaging suggests, it’s very potent. I think I prefer it over some similar tasting “liquirizia purissima” products (like Amarelli, example here) only because this type doesn’t feel so chalky and doesn’t crumble in your mouth. When one of the Amarellis crumbles, I usually have to spit it out. But this one you can suck on until it disappears. 

Photo 20 Jan 1 note Close-up of the Godis Lakrits mix I picked up at IKEA yesterday. Very satisfying licorice, in line with other Swedish and Finnish and chew licorice I’ve had. 

Close-up of the Godis Lakrits mix I picked up at IKEA yesterday. Very satisfying licorice, in line with other Swedish and Finnish and chew licorice I’ve had. 

Photo 20 Jan 2 notes Yummy licorice mix called Godis Lakrits, purchased at IKEA. I think this might be a new product because I never saw it in their food shop until yesterday. Anyway, it’s actually two types of licorice, square tire tracks and logs. Both are black licorice with a slight saltiness. Good stuff! 

Yummy licorice mix called Godis Lakrits, purchased at IKEA. I think this might be a new product because I never saw it in their food shop until yesterday. Anyway, it’s actually two types of licorice, square tire tracks and logs. Both are black licorice with a slight saltiness. Good stuff! 

Photo 19 Jan Close-up of the Salty Licorice Fish, imported from Sweden by the Chicago Importing Company and sold at IKEA and other fine merchants. They’re perfectly chewy and for taste, the saltiness dominates the licorice flavor, but they’re not too salty. They’d be a good intro to salty licorice, I think. 

Close-up of the Salty Licorice Fish, imported from Sweden by the Chicago Importing Company and sold at IKEA and other fine merchants. They’re perfectly chewy and for taste, the saltiness dominates the licorice flavor, but they’re not too salty. They’d be a good intro to salty licorice, I think. 

Photo 19 Jan So yesterday I stopped by IKEA to pick up some Swedish goodies (jam, bread mix, cheese, etc.) and lo and behold, they had two new types of licorice on offer. These are Salty Licorice Fish, marketed under the Nordic Sweets banner, imported by the Chicago Importing Company. Good stuff! Review coming up in next post.

So yesterday I stopped by IKEA to pick up some Swedish goodies (jam, bread mix, cheese, etc.) and lo and behold, they had two new types of licorice on offer. These are Salty Licorice Fish, marketed under the Nordic Sweets banner, imported by the Chicago Importing Company. Good stuff! Review coming up in next post.

Video 11 Dec

My friend said this was his favorite of all the licorice he tried in Iceland and I can see why. The Olsen Olsen is a chocolate bar filled with licorice and caramel. So tasty! Although I still think the Pipar Perlur are my favorite.

A funny review from KIOSK:

Olsen Olsen, the candy bar, is named after an Icelandic card game much like Uno or Go Fish. Note the spades, hearts, diamonds and clubs on the wrapper. The band Sigur Rós has a song of the same title but apparently it derives from the card game, although I think it would have been way cooler if they named it after the candy bar. In the United States there is no doubt one could name it after the Olsen Twins but please don’t! This candy bar is NOT skanky, if you see what I mean. Take a bite and you will find a crazy concoction of licorice, caramel and chocolate in no particular order. An N1 gas station provided me with my first Olsen Olsen late one night. Although Icelandic hot dogs are amazing (more on this later and yes my fellow vegetarians I did a naughty one in Iceland) the Olsen Olsen does circles around any doggie, any day.

Text 10 Dec

rlok0214 asked: Hi, Just wanted to send you a quick thank you note for your blog. I eat licorice for taste and for health benefits. Anyhow, I am currently in Budapest, where licorice is not so common, but I wanted to try the Negroes candy. I googled the name to see if I could find a description of the taste before going out and buying it. Funny enough, I came across your blog AND discovered that you are also from Atlanta (I'm an Atlanta native :-)). Anyhow, thank you for your wonderful, detailed blog!

Awesome! Fan mail!

Re the Negroes candy, I’m not sure it’s actually much licorice.

If there are any shops with imports from Germany they will have licorice for sure.

Wendy

Video 10 Dec 1 note

This tasty licorice, marketed with a map of Iceland and the Icelandic flag on it, is actually another Danish import my friend picked up in Iceland. Gammeldags Lakrids translates from Danish to “Old Fashioned Licorice.” These are tasty, pretty much the Danish/Icelandic equivalent of the "Tire Tread" Finnish licorice I posted about earlier this year.

Video 10 Dec

These weird little things are another Danish treat my friend picked up in Iceland. Tyrkisk Peber Volcano translate as “Turkish Pepper Volcano.” They’re supposed to be hot (spicy) but on the first sample, I didn’t find that true, though later I tried again and did they did have a spicy aftertaste. Meanwhile, I must mention that these are basically licorice pyramids filled with goo.

In fact, this British candy merchant describes them better than I can:

Tyrkisk Peber Volcano live up to their name in more ways than one. First, the packs contain two shapes - cone and square based “volcanoes” - which are both filled with delicious gooey “lava”. Next, these are rated 3-flames, nice and hot! And last of all, this Volcano variety lives up to the name of Tyrkisk Peber itself - you will not be disappointed!

Link 9 Dec Salty liquorice: The not-so-sweet sweet»

Finally found something that explains better than I could the deal with the sort of licorice I so love and so often blog about. It especially talks about the ammonium chloride, i.e salmiakki.

Do note that the writer keeps talking about Finnish candy but the Germans, Dutch, Danish, Swedes, Norwegians and Icelanders love it too. 

Excerpt:
Salmiakki is a soft liquorice with ammonium chloride added to give it its distinctive saltiness. More ammonium chloride means stronger, saltier and more potent salmiakki.

Video 9 Dec

This licorice, which my friend bought in Iceland, is actually Danish. I realized this by the fact I could easily read the name — Bløde saltlakridser med aegte lakridspulver — using my German. Icelandic isn’t something I can just read off, but Danish is close enough to German, I can. Anyway, the label doesn’t, BTW, say “bloody licorice” but rather “Soft licorice with genuine licorice powder.” They’re made by Danish firm Dracula — I swear. As for how they taste, they’re pretty much licorice gummies dusted with licorice powder. 

Video 9 Dec

Another very tasty Icelandic licorice treat — Lakkriz Sprengur, which translate as “Licorice Bombs.” The friend who brought them said that chocolate-licorice combos are big in Iceland. So a chocolate bar will just have chunks of licorice in it. These are chocolate covered licorice-caramel balls. Extremely chewy. I don’t think I’d recommend them to somebody with a temporary crown or something.

Video 8 Dec 1 note

My favorite of all the licorice types my friend brought home from Iceland were the Pipar Perlur. The name translate to “Pepper Pearls.” These are the Lindt chocolate of the licorice world, I think. Chewy, strong little balls of licorice, covered in chocolate and then licorice powder. It was all I could do not to down the whole box. Nom nom nom nom! 


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